Press "Enter" to skip to content

Historical Record Collections Added in the First Half of December

MyHeritage has just added seven new collections encompassing 16.2 million records from all over the world: Netherlands, Notarial Records; Inwards Unassisted Passengers to Victoria; Jewish Holocaust Memorials and Jewish Residents of Germany 1939–1945; Copenhagen Emigration Index; and burial collections from Canada, Ireland, and the U.K.

Here is the full breakdown of the records:

Collection Description Number of Records Link to Search
Netherlands, Notarial Records, 1600-1935 An index to notarial records throughout the Netherlands from 1600 to 1935. 10,677,361 records Search collection now
Canada, Burials, 1800-2019 An index to burial records from Canada from 1800 to 2019. 2,137,853 records Search collection now
Inwards Unassisted Passengers to Victoria 1852-1923 A list of people who arrived into Victoria from overseas ports from 1852 to 1923. 1,813,245 records Search collection now
Jewish Holocaust Memorials and Jewish Residents of Germany 1939-1945 Memorial records of Holocaust victims from the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, France, Austria, Belgium and Luxembourg. The collection also includes Jews who lived in Germany from 1933 to 1945. 848,844 records

Search collection now
Denmark, Copenhagen Emigration Index, 1869-1908 An index of police emigration protocols for individuals emigrating from Copenhagen from 1869 to 1908. 386,077 records

Search collection now
Republic of Ireland, Index of Burials, 1900-2019 An index of cemetery records from various cemeteries throughout Ireland from 1900 to 2019. 205,995 records Search collection now
United Kingdom, Index of Burials, 1900-2019 Same as above for the U.K. 158,099 records

Search collection now

Netherlands, Notarial Records, 1600–1935

This collection of over 10.6 million records is an index to notarial records throughout the Netherlands. Notarial records are kept by notaries, public officers appointed by the Dutch government to provide services including drafting, authenticating, and registering legal documents. Documents notarized in this collection that are useful for genealogical research include wills and testaments, estate inventories/divisions, marriage contracts, guardianships, and mortgages.

Notarization began in the Netherlands in the 16th century. At that time, no notarial records were kept in the provinces of Drenthe, Friesland, Gelderland, Groningen, Limburg, and Overijssel. However, in 1811, the Netherlands was annexed by the French Empire, which led to a standardization of notarial law and notaries being appointed in these provinces.

Information in these records includes the names of the applicants, their residence, occupation, and the notarial record date and type.

Canada, Burials, 1800–2019

This free collection of over 2 million records is an index to burial records from Canada. Records typically list the name of the deceased, death year, birth year, and burial place. Burials usually took place with a few days of death. Cemeteries can help you trace the burial and or death of a Canadian relative. Burial records may also help identify ancestors not recorded in other records.

Inwards Unassisted Passengers to Victoria 1852–1923

This collection of 1.8 million records includes people who arrived in Victoria from overseas ports between 1852 and 1923. The lists are sometimes called “unassisted passenger lists,” as immigrants funded the cost of their own voyage. The records generally include first name and surname, marital status, age, sex, nationality, and occupation.

Information recorded about the ship includes the name of the ship’s captain, dates of departure, and total number of passengers.

Jewish Holocaust Memorials and Jewish Residents of Germany 1939–1945

This free collection includes records of Jewish Holocaust victims from memorials in the Czech Republic, Netherlands, France, Austria, Belgium, and Luxembourg. The collection also includes 442,972 Jews who lived in Germany from 1933 to 1945. A record may include: given name, surname, maiden name, birth date, birthplace, residence, death date, death place, place of imprisonment, and deportation or emigration.

The list of Jewish residents in the German Reich 1933–1945 records the individual life and biography dates of about 600,000 people who resided within the borders of the German Reich (as of December 31, 1937) and who were persecuted because of their Jewish origin or religion.

Population censuses were taken on June 16, 1933 and May 17, 1939. These 2 censuses provide information about the number of Jewish residents in Germany, and they reveal the dramatic decline of the Jewish population in Germany during the 1930s as a result of Nazi persecution: many Jews emigrated or were expelled, the remaining population aged, and the birth rate dropped. While in June 1933 almost 500,000 members of the Jewish community had been registered, there were only approximately 234,000 people of Jewish origin left in the territory of the old Reich in May 1939.

Denmark, Copenhagen Emigration Index, 1869–1908

This collection is an index of police emigration protocols for individuals who emigrated from Copenhagen between 1869 and 1908. Records may contain the following searchable information: first and last name, birthplace, estimated birth year, former residence, and date of registration with the Copenhagen police. The age of the individual at the time of emigration, ship name, occupation, contract number, and additional comments are also viewable.

The Copenhagen police emigration protocols were introduced in the Danish parliament on May 1, 1668. The vast majority of these records list individuals who emigrated to the United States. Registration in the protocols was required both to emigrate directly from Denmark or by way of another European city, and subsequently, the records do not necessarily represent the final departure location of the emigrant. The majority of the records are for Danish citizens, but there are also over 150,000 records of non-Danish emigrants, primarily Swedes.

Republic of Ireland, Index of Burials, 1900–2019

This free collection includes records from various cemeteries located in the Republic of Ireland. A record may include the name of the cemetery, given name and surname of the deceased, age, city, date of birth, date of death, and religion. Note that some records are pre-1900.

Cemetery records are especially helpful for identifying ancestors who were not recorded in other records, such as children who died young or women.

United Kingdom, Index of Burials, 1900–2019

This free collection includes records from various cemeteries located in the United Kingdom. A record may include the name of the cemetery, given name and surname of the deceased, age, city, date of birth, date of death, and religion. Note that some records are pre-1900.

Cemetery records are especially helpful for identifying ancestors who were not recorded in other records, such as children who died young or women.

Summary

Enjoy searching all of these new collections that are now available on MyHeritage SuperSearch™. Searching these records is always free, and you can also view and save records to your family tree from four collections in this update: the Jewish Holocaust Memorials and Jewish Residents of Germany 1939–1945 and the three burial collections from Canada, Ireland and the U.K. Our Record Matching technology will notify you automatically if any of these records mention a member of your family tree. You’ll then be able to review the record and decide if you’d like to add the new information to your tree. To fully access Record Matches or to view or save records from the other collections, you’ll need a Data or Complete subscription.

What treasures have you discovered? Let us know in the comments!

The post Historical Record Collections Added in the First Half of December appeared first on MyHeritage Blog.

Source: My Heritage

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *